Archive | February, 2014

The Waldheimerin at the DWF

21 Feb

Look!! This lost little comic of mine has found a home on the digisphere … indeed it’s on a map! Which is nice, because it, unto itself, maps out a route taken by a large female across the island of Tassie and onto the mainland. This piece is part of the ongoing Sleuth series … there will also be a new exhibition of Sleuth in Launceston in April – opening at Sawtooth ARI on April 4th. WOOHOO!!! In fact – the Waldheimerin will be at the exhibition.

To read the entire piece at the Digital Writers’ Festival website – go to http://digitalwritersfestival.com/mapping-the-words/the-waldheimerin/

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Translating comics

15 Feb

On Thursday of this week I’ll be presenting a talk in Hobart at the Tas Writers Centre – Adaptation, comics, cultures.

I’ll be showing some bits and bobs about the process of adapting an academic essay into a long-form comic, the trials, tribulations, headaches and successes. I found this process endlessly fascinating – grappling with this difficult beast involves the mechanics of both mediums involved – prose and comics. I’ll have a chat about the various things that you can and can’t do with both mediums, how emphasis changes and how meanings can shift as you reimagine the same content into a different form.

6:30pm at the meeting room at Salamanca Arts Centre, put on by the Twitch writers group with the assistance of the Tasmanian Writers Centre.

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Joshua Santospirito’s Craig San Roque’s Long Weekend in Alice Springs

3 Feb

A review of the Long Weekend in Alice Springs by Jonathon Shaw.

Me fail? I fly!

Craig San Roque, The Long Weekend in Alice Springs, adapted and drawn by Joshua Santospirito (San Kessto Publications 2013)

1lwas In 2004, an essay by Alice Springs psychologist Craig San Roque appeared in the formidably titled volume, The Cultural Complex: Contemporary Jungian Perspectives on Psyche and Society, edited by Thomas Singer and Samuel L. Kimbles and published by The Psychology Press in the UK. According to an author’s note, the 16-page essay, ‘A long weekend: Alice Springs, Central Australia

suggests that ancient, habitual, mythically reinforced psychic structures may be repeating themselves autonomously from a basic pattern, rather like a DNA system. Such patterns may be encoded into legends or hieratic dramas associated with specific sites and can be detected by analysing mythologised stories embedded in cultural sites, by analysing how a culture developed (and perverted) the use of primal tools and by noting what cultural groups do…

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