Archive | Publishing RSS feed for this section

Media – Jan 2014

24 Jan

A few things lately
- David Nixon of ABC Open wrote a very affecting blog response to the graphic novel The Long Weekend in Alice Springs – I recommend you have a read, it’s good.

- Also The Long Weekend was included in Readings end of year list of 5 best GNs (in their opinion) which is exciting.

- Most exciting is that it also won an AWARD!

- On a different topic – I wrote this piece for the Meanjin website

2014 is looking busy … very busy – I’ll keep you all posted.

Captain Blueberry

21 Jan

This project is bloody great … bloody great – you must have a look at the Crowd-funding campaign TODAY!!
1389247417

Comicoz Award

4 Jan

I was a bit surprised but very chuffed (I must say!) to find this morning that The Long Weekend in Alice Springs had been awarded the Comicoz Award for Best Australian Original Comic Book for 2013!

Thanks to Nat Karmichael and Comicoz – very much appreciated.

 

Book Design Podcast

24 Dec

Nadine Kessler, book designer of The Long Weekend in Alice Springs (amongst many more books) was interviewed by Paige Turner on the radio the other week – on the Edge Radio BOOKSHOW.

Listen to the interview here.

Nadine on bookshow

ARAS website

18 Dec

The ARAS website is now featuring The Long Weekend in Alice Springs!

The Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (ARAS) is a pictorial and written archive of mythological, ritualistic, and symbolic images from all over the world and from all epochs of human history. The collection probes the universality of archetypal themes and provides a testament to the deep and abiding connections that unite the disparate factions of the human family.

The ARAS archive contains about 17,000 photographic images, each cross-indexed, individually mounted, and accompanied by scholarly commentary. The commentary includes a description of the image with a cultural history that serves to place it in its unique historical and geographical setting. Often it also includes an archetypal commentary that brings the image into focus for its modern psychological and symbolic meaning, as well as a bibliography for related reading and a glossary of technical terms.

You can buy The Long Weekend in Alice Springs at the SanKessto Publications website

The Long Weekend in Alice Springs

This is Craig San Roque’s intro to the graphic novel on the website“From my perspective as a depth psychologist, I see that those who have a connection with story are in better shape and have a better prognosis than those to whom story must be introduced – to have ‘story awareness’ is per se psychologically therapeutic. It is good for soul. Coming early with life it is already a perspective to life. One integrates life as story because one has stories in the back of the mind”
-James Hillman, A Note on Story in Loose Ends.

And what if one lives in a place that has stories already there in the backyards of the town. What if one lives in a town that sits in the midst of stories and at a location that is a site of ancient and sacred stories humming away in the back of the mind. What if the minds, hearts and bodies of the people who dwell there are overshadowed by the mountain, the rocks, the rivers, the trees that are embodiments of the stories, images, myths of the peoples who have lived there for millennia and live there still – under the influence of mythic actions, symbolic trees, rocks, mountains, even if those mythic actions, those scenes, have been shoved to the back of the mind.

Alice Springs, the town where I live, is one such place. It is a border town in arid desert regions in the center of Australia. It is 1,7000 km (1,000 miles) from the nearest cities. It was established maybe 130 years ago as an outpost of the British colonization of the Australian continent. It is built right smack on top of indigenous tribal lands of the Arrerente peoples. Alice Springs, as it is known in English, is also known as Mparntwe or Mbantua in the Arrernte Aboriginal tongue.

Like many other border towns in the Americas, Africa, and Asia where indigenous people meet the incoming rampage of another and different civilization, the original landforms of Mbantua (Alice Springs, Australia) embody the traditional mythological stories of the people. The mountain range surrounding the town embodies a mythic creation story. The rocks and trees and river in Arrernte myth are living presences exerting mental influence. Mythic creatures and stories animate the landscape. You walk out your front door and you can see the story of the Dog embedded in the mountain range; walk out your back door and you can see the trees that represent mythic women dancing in ceremony. The townsfolk live in ancient time and in real time in a most interesting, continuous and yet ordinary way. It is this notion of depicting intersecting realities that The Long Weekend in Alice Spring attempts.

-Craig San Roque

Hoppers – launched in Hobart

12 Dec

So – issue#2 of the SanKessto’s DOWN THERE series of Tascomix is now available!
Tricky Walsh’s beautiful comic – Hoppers 1: the ‘manias

Pic 1 – Andrew Harper book-launching
Pic 2 – Tricky Walsh book-pointing
Andrew Harper yackingImage of Tricky with books

Adelaide Launch Sat 30, 3pm

20 Nov

Adelaide – Diarise it!
SAT 30/11/2013, 3pm at the SA Writers Centre in the city.
To be launched by Jennifer Mills who is an awesome novelist who resides in the Clare Valley.
Joshua Santospirito will be at the launch to sign any copies you might like.
The book will be available at Imprints Booksellers afterwards for anyone who can’t make it to the launch and who wants a copy of the book before Christmas – or you can go to the Sankessto website and nab a copy from there.
web 2013 Nov-Oct Book tour

San Kessto’s new production

10 Nov

One thing that I should let ya’ll know about – I am ridiculously exciteable to announce that San Kessto Publications’ next little baby in the DOWN THERE series will be 100 copies of Tricky Walsh’s Hoppers 1: the ‘manias.
Promo page
I started the Down There series in July 2013 with my own issue of Sleuth. The general theme of the series is Tasmania, but the interpretation of that theme is pretty vague and with that I have gone to artists/comic-artists and asked them to each produce a medium to long-form comic for the series, to be released up to 4 times each year in runs of 100. Basically … I just wanted to read more comics from those who lived in the same place as me … Tasmania. Tricky’s issue will be the first of … possibly a few … Which I think is bloody exciting in itself. Future artists in the series will be Tom OHern (flippin hell!!), Lindsay Arnold (OMG – Linzee RNold) & Gary Chaloner (cripes!).

The launch of Hoppers will be at the Hobart Bookshop on Thursday the 12th of December – you can buy a copy from the San Kessto website from today – it’ll be sent out to you after the 10th of December. More info closer to the time!! Stay tuned! Or … as Tricky herself would say – “Woo!”
Front cover - web

Sydney Booklaunch of The Long Weekend in Alice Springs

1 Oct

web 2013 Nov-Oct Book tour

Booklaunch at 6pm at the MCA shop – Thursday 24th of October
(Museum is open until 9pm on Thursdays)

This popular Australian graphic novel was published early in 2013 and is already in its second print will be launched at the MCA by the inimitable Pat Grant (Blue) and the wonderful Dr Anne Noonan.

Josh Santospirito, who adapted and drew the graphic novel, will be present for booksigning and a natter at the MCA shop.

Learn more about the book at sankessto.com

A strange and beautiful graphic novel about the psychological effects of colonisation. Craig San Roque, an Alice Springs psychologist, takes us throughout a long series of poetic thoughts and places over the course of a long weekend in the central Australian desert town of Alice Springs. He grapples with an analysis of his own culture and the pain which it intentionally and unintentionally inflicts upon other cultures.
in 2007 Joshua Santospirito, a psychiatric nurse in the Central Australian desert, came across the essay A Long Weekend in Alice Springs by Craig San Roque in a book called The Cultural Complex. Josh found this piece instrumental in reframing all of the seeming chaos around him and began to reframe the essay itself into comic form.

Available in Sydney at the MCA shop and also Kinokuniya, Gleebooks and Better Read Than Dead.

Printrun #2 and a few new REVIEWS

6 Jul

Well well well … I had 500 copies of The Long Weekend printed in March of this year … my initial thoughts was, well that should keep me going for about 2 years or so, its such an obscure book that it’ll be a slow-burner at best.

But then I sold out in 2 months.

Which took me somewhat by surprise … a GOOD surprise … but a surprise nonetheless.

So I have now printed 1000 copies for the second print-run, again at a Hobart-based printer (gotta keep printing skills in the local neighbourhood, less and less books are being printed in our local community which is really sad). This time, it’ll be sent to some bookstores, rather than sell them just myself at booklaunches and whatnot so perhaps a different buncha people will get to the books, hope so!

Recent Media reviews and spots from June/July 2013
Australian Newspaper Review Magazine
Readings Boostore – review ComicOz review
Warp Magazine - Tasmania

Older Media stuff
A really beautifully written review at Alice Springs News
masthead
The Comic Spot interview
Framed Magazine
Alice Online article

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 413 other followers